The Oystercatcher: News and Events from the Mayne Island Conservancy

June, 2020

Remembering Alan Ryder

Remembering Alan Ryder
By Nancy Gibson
It was Scotch Broom that brought Alan Ryder into the Mayne Island Conservancy family, and what a gift he was! Whilst enthusiastically bashing broom on Felix Jack Road with members of the Broom Action Team, Alan was encouraged to join the Mayne Island Conservancy Board where he revealed another of his invaluable skills: accounting. At this time, the Conservancy was …
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Member Renewal

During 2019, the Mayne Island Conservancy hosted many events including guided ecology and birding walks, visiting speaker presentations and movie nights, plus a wonderful weekend mushroom extravaganza. In addition, we were able to provide information about the Conservancy, our programs and on-going projects through our information tables at the Farmers Market and other island gatherings.

Sadly, 2020 does not promise the same richness of educational and social opportunities on Mayne for the foreseeable future, although our important work of land restoration, data collecting, research projects and more continues behind the scenes.
Therefore, we are hoping that our Conservancy friends will renew their memberships online this year and consider making a monthly or once only donation. Membership fees remain the same at $5 for an individual and $15 for a family and, while not expensive, are very important to us when applying for public funding.

Not sure if your membership is up to date? Please contact Maggi by hitting "reply" to this email newsletter.

Nudibranchs of Mayne Island

Nudibranchs of Mayne Island
By Charlotte Matthews
Weekly Sea Discovery: Nudibranchs! Commonly known as sea slugs, nudibranchs are creatures that are a mystery to many of us. These squishy invertebrates can be found in the shallow intertidal, down to the deep depths of the subtidal. Their vibrant colours and intricate shapes make them an eye-catching surprise in the murky waters of the Pacific Northwest. But how do …
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Aggregate Green Anemone

Aggregate Green Anemone
By Charlotte Matthews
These small greenish anemones with bright pink tips are an easy find in our local rocky intertidal areas, and can form large colonies. To survive in these turbid, shallow environments, aggregate green anemones stick to the substrate below them, enabling them to endure massive wave forces without being pulled away. Being attached to the ground …
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Count Your Bats!

Count Your Bats!
By Joël Lavigueur
Attention Mayne Islanders! It’s time for BC’s Annual Community Bat Count and we need your help. The Mayne Island Community Bat Conservation Program is looking for new roost sites to monitor as part of our annual program. Have you seen 5 or more bats flying around your property? Have you seen any emerging at twilight from their roost—attic, soffit, wall, …
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Whelks of Mayne Island

Whelks of Mayne Island
By Charlotte Matthews
We’re feeling extra whelky here today at the Mayne Island Conservancy, so we’re featuring two different whelks: the Dire Whelk and the Frilled Dogwinkle! You can find these predatory marine snails in the intertidal ares surrounding Mayne Island by turning over rocks or sorting through seaweed at low tide. These intertidal snails can get up to 5 cm long, but they look quite different from each other. Dire Whelks have horizontal striped …
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Pacific Sand Lance

Pacific Sand Lance
By Charlotte Matthews
Today’s Weekly Sea Discovery: the Pacific Sand Lance! Pacific Sand Lance are members of the extremely important food web group known as “Forage Fish”. You may recognize this term from recent news about another member of this group, the Pacific Herring, which has faced over-exploitation along the coast of British Columbia. Forage fish are important link in the food web between microscopic plankton and higher-level consumer species, such as marine mammals, …
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The Mayne Island Conservancy works with the community to conserve the ecology of Mayne Island and its surrounding waters for future generations.

Help us continue our important work in marine research and education by donating online now. Any donations will contribute to our continuing environmental work on this beautiful island. We thank you for your continued support.
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