The Oystercatcher: News and Events from the Mayne Island Conservancy

August 2020

Annual General Meeting

Malcolm Inglis

The Mayne Island Conservancy will be holding its Annual General Meeting at 1pm on August 8th at Miners Bay Park. All are welcome to come and join us and to learn more about the Conservancy's work. Registration and membership sales begin at 12:45pm with separate tables for current members, renewing members, and new membership sales. This year the meeting will be brief, lasting no more than 30 minutes, with no refreshments served afterwards.

As per Provincial guidelines, the following health measures will be in place:
  • 50 person limit
  • Chair layout prearranged with separate areas for presenters and attendees
  • Hand sanitizer on site
  • Printed copies of agenda and supporting documents provided. Please bring your own pen.
We will be keeping a record of attendees for contact-tracing purposes, so please be prepared to give us your email or phone number upon registration.

Orange Sea Pen

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Charlotte Matthews

Suitably named after the old-fashioned quilled pen, sea pens have a very distinct shape. Sea pens are cnidarians and are related to soft corals, sea fans, anemones and jellies. These bottom-dwelling invertebrates look quite different from their other stinging cousins. But up close, you can see a tell-tale …

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The Small(er) Land Mammals of Mayne Island

The Small(er) Land Mammals of Mayne Island
Charlotte Matthews

In this article, we discuss some of the various land mammals found on Mayne Island and their role in our local ecosystems. Not only are these animals essential to the balance and function of our ecosystems, but they also have some fascinating behaviours! Northern River Otter (Lontra canadensis; Weasel) A common sight around Mayne Island and other coastal areas in …

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Mayne Island Field Notes

Observations submitted by Joan Sutherland
Photo: Jim T, Flickr Commons

Before I moved to Mayne Island and got up close and personal with them, it had never occurred to me that those ugly electrical wires that keep our houses running are also a grand place for birds to hang out. I have had the privilege of seeing fights break out as the various bird groups vie for dictatorship of the wires, and have watched as wren and sparrow parents feed their precariously perched, voraciously hungry babies,
Goldfinches have a rest there while deciding where to fly off to next, and tiny hummingbirds perch and scan the sky ready to dive bomb anyone they deem to be an intruder. Juncos, robins, towhees, wrens - on and on the list of birds goes… Seeing it all unfold brings me much great joy.

(Do you have a nature observation you'd like to share? Please email it to info@mayneconservancy.ca)

Grunt Sculpin

Grunt Sculpin
Charlotte Matthews

The grunt sculpin is a favourite fish of many divers and ocean enthusiasts in the Pacific Northwest. When I first laid my eyes upon this stripy, stout-looking fish, I thought it looked quite tropical. With its small size (up to 8 cm long), large head and unique patterning, the grunt sculpin …

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Bubble Snails

Bubble Snails
Charlotte Matthews

As we continue our eelgrass surveys in our local waters, I am always amazed at the diversity of exciting creatures we encounter. Last week, we mapped an area by Montague Harbour and came upon hundreds of egg deposits in the eelgrass bed (see photo). Though I couldn’t track down what was laying these eggs, our …

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Gunnels

Gunnels
Charlotte Matthews

While turning over rocks and searching for hidden creatures along Mayne Island's shores, you may see a long, slippery animal slide into a dark crevice. Your first guess might be that you’ve just seen an eel, with a long tapered body and round head, but these are in-fact gunnels! Gunnels are fish with bodies …

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The Conservancy is grateful for your support and welcomes donations, either one time or monthly.

And your membership is also important to us.
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